Blog Post
05/20/2020
By Donald A. Rea

OSHA announced an Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan for COVID-19 ("Updated Plan") that will replace its current Interim Plan in its entirety as of May 26, 2020. As non-essential businesses re-open, OSHA is returning to its inspection planning policy prior to the pandemic in areas where community spread is decreasing, but will continue to prioritize COVID-19 cases. Inspection activities in response to COVID-19-related complaints and employer-reported illnesses will continue on a frequent basis for facilities with high and very high exposure risk jobs such as hospitals, emergency medical centers and emergency response facilities. The Updated Plan notes that OSHA will rely on the Occupational Health and Safety Act’s general duty clause to enforce violations if employers do not comply with COVID-19 mitigation measures

Blog Post
12/01/2015
By Donald A. Rea

You cannot open a trade publication without reading about the shortage of skilled labor. Carpenters, welders, steel workers, electricians, project managers and estimators are in short supply. An Associated General Contractors of America survey found that 74 percent of the respondents believe there is a crunch in skilled trades and 53 percent report an inability to hire needed professionals; other surveys indicate the shortage is expected to worsen in coming years.

Blog Post
01/20/2014
By John P. Englert

In an attempt to strengthen its Crystalline Silica exposure rule, on September 12, 2013, OSHA proposed significant changes that could result in higher compliance costs and may require additional risk management strategies for affected industries. 78 Fed. Reg. 56274. The more stringent proposed rule will affect the construction and manufacturing industries, as well as operations using industrial sand products, such as hydraulic fracturing in the oil and gas industry.