Recent Posts tagged as 'CFPB'
Blog Post
06/30/2020
By Francis X. Riley III and John L. Ropiequet

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 29 that the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) cannot constitutionally be subject to removal only for cause, as provided by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act), but must instead be removable at the President’s will. Seila Law LLC v. CFPB, No. 19-7 (U.S. June 29, 2020), arose from a constitutional challenge to the CFPB’s authority to issue a civil investigative demand (CID) for documents and information from a law firm that handled debt relief services. The firm asserted that the single-director structure of the agency, with the director removable only for cause, was a violation of the separation of powers under the Constitution. The district court rejected the argument and was affirmed by the Ninth Circuit.

Blog Post
01/03/2020
By Ryan L. DiClemente

In December 2019, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued its Supervisory Highlights covering its findings from examinations in the areas of credit reporting and the furnishing of credit information to consumer reporting agencies (CRAs). The following are a few of the key takeaways from the CFPB’s findings and comments.

Blog Post
11/12/2019
By Francis X. Riley III

The U.S. Supreme Court has already agreed to a consider in the matter of Seila Law v. CFPB whether the for-cause requirement for the President’s dismissal of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (“CFPB”) director is unconstitutional as a violation of the separation of powers.

Blog Post
10/21/2019
By Francis X. Riley III

The United States Supreme Court has granted certiorari in the matter of Seila Law LLC v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to address the question of whether the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) single-director structure and the President's authority to remove the director only “for cause,” as prescribed by 12 U.S.C. § 5491(c)(3), violate the separation of powers.

Blog Post
08/28/2019
By Francis X. Riley III

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced on Tuesday, August 27, 2019 a consent order entered into with Maxitransfers Corp., a Texas-based money transmitter, following its investigation of Maxitransfers’ compliance with the Remittance Rule’s regulations concerning transmission error-resolution policies and consumer disclosures.

Blog Post
05/20/2019
By John L. Ropiequet

In Consumer Financial Protection Bureau v. Seila Law LLC, 2019 WL 1985350 (9th Cir. May 6, 2019), the Ninth Circuit followed the earlier decision of the D.C. Circuit in PHH Corp. v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 881 F.3d 75 (D.C. Cir. 2018) (en banc), in holding that the single-director structure of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is constitutional.

Blog Post
04/11/2019
By Francis X. Riley III

Recently, joined by former CFPB Director Richard Cordray, California Assemblywoman Monique Limon (D-Santa Barbara) told a press gathering that she planned to introduce legislation to create a state-level version of the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), either by raising the budget of the state’s Department of Business Oversight (DBO) or through the creation of a new state agency.

Blog Post
02/11/2019
By Francis X. Riley III

The CFPB’s proposed amendments to its Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Costs Installment Loans Rule have changes that are generally disliked by consumer advocacy groups and applauded by them as well.