Published: September 26, 2015

For many people who reach the customary retirement age of 65, it’s not time to sit on the porch in a rocking chair. Because of advances in health care and greater attention to developing good habits, people at 65 are physically and mentally able to do more. Call it the second season or whatever, there is a desire to remain active. It could be a second career or something related to the prior career. Or it could be charitable work or greater attention to a hobby. Studies, as well as common sense, prove that staying active is a key to a longer and more satisfying retirement.

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Published: September 26, 2015

Numerous articles discuss the ongoing march of baby boomers to retirement, and part of that process involves succession planning for businesses. There are several steps to the planning process, and the process itself should begin at least 3-5 years before the planned sale and its aftermath. No business should be sold or transferred to family members until there has been detailed estate and tax planning, and some of that should take place years before the event.

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Published: July 27, 2015

Recently, the British government decided to allow people over 55 to cash in their pensions, and the result, according to the Financial Times, has been a dramatic upswing in fraudulent schemes. People have been offered pension reviews and investments with remarkably high rates of return as a way of gaining access to their pension funds, which are then stolen or lost. Although it’s an example from another country, this news makes several important points. First, if people contact you with “freebies” or incredible investment opportunities, look at them very carefully.

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Published: July 5, 2015

Among the many articles about retirement planning, a couple stand out as offering interesting “takes” on the process:
1. One study reports that retirees in better health are more likely to feel financially secure, enjoy retirement and feel fulfilled. No surprise, but worth remembering.
2. Among workers with at least $1,000,000 in investable assets, the average planned age for retirement, according to another study. But 53% will continue to work in retirement, suggesting that retirement might mean “retooling”.

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Published: June 10, 2015

A recent survey conducted by US Trust on the subjects of wealth and worth reported the views of high net worth investors. Interesting and revealing. The most important component of wealth? No surprise, it’s health. If you can maintain your health in your retirement years, they will be richer and more fulfilling. Plus being healthy means spending less on medical care, which makes retirement less expensive. The takeaway: money and effort devoted to maintaining and improving your health is well worthwhile.

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Published: May 25, 2015

In his recent book At Last, the English writer Edward St. Aubyn describes the choices that members of a wealthy family make to distribute their wealth, and how those choices affect the family in ways not expected. In a way, the book illustrates the discussion we often have with wealthy families: wealth is better than the opposite, but it’s very important to plan how that wealth passes to succeeding generations, so that it doesn’t end up destroying initiative and achievement. Perhaps there’s a need for both philanthropy and maximizing the opportunities for the family.

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Published: May 19, 2015

It seems that these days, every other person is a coach: life coach, executive coach, retirement coach, stage coach. But calling yourself a coach or any other kind of expert doesn’t make your advice worth listening to. Some people in the St. Louis area recently found this out “the hard way”. According to Financial Advisor online news, a local investment advisor and radio show host who called himself a financial coach persuaded people to give him more than $3,000,000 to invest.

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Published: May 6, 2015

And that is, not involving your spouse in the planning and decision-making process. Even in these modern times, it’s often the case that the husband makes and carries out financial decisions. The wife knows little about why decisions were made. Then, if the wife is the surviving spouse, she is lost in trying to decide on financial matters, and can be prey to people who want to help themselves to her assets. It’s far better to explain every step with your spouse, if you have one, and to be sure that both of you understand what’s being done and why.

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Published: May 6, 2015

And that is, not involving your spouse in the planning and decision-making process. Even in these modern times, it’s often the case that the husband makes and carries out financial decisions. The wife knows little about why decisions were made. Then, if the wife is the surviving spouse, she is lost in trying to decide on financial matters, and can be prey to people who want to help themselves to her assets. It’s far better to explain every step with your spouse, if you have one, and to be sure that both of you understand what’s being done and why.

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Published: May 1, 2015

An interesting report from Bernstein Investments discusses choices you can make that will enhance the chances that you will have a successful retirement. Here are their categories:

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