Published: January 2, 2020

In December, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a flurry of employer-friendly decisions.  Management can toast the following end-of-year gifts and look forward to continuing success at the Board in the new year.

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Published: December 31, 2019

In 2019, we saw significant activity in state legislatures passing employment-related laws in areas where federal government efforts had stalled, like paid sick leave, non-compete agreements and workplace discrimination. Another important area where states took action concerns the raising of minimum hourly wages. In fact, workers in half the states (25 including D.C.) will see an increase in hourly minimum wage rates at some point in 2020.

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Published: December 26, 2019

The Washington, D.C. City Council is considering a proposed bill that would ban non-compete agreements for workers making nearly six-figures, titled the Ban on Noncompete Agreements Act of 2019.

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Published: December 18, 2019

According to data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC"), in 2018, 6.9% of all sexual harassment charges submitted to the EEOC were filed in Illinois, representing the third highest concentration for any state, behind Texas (9.7%) and Florida (9.6%). Notably, that number has increased each year since 2014.

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Published: December 12, 2019

As referenced in our prior WISE blog article here, earlier this year Illinois enacted legislation legalizing recreational marijuana for adults, effective January 1, 2020 (the “Adult Use Act”).  However, given the ambiguity in the original legislation as it related to employer liability and, more specifically, the liability for terminating (or withdrawing a job offer for) employees for testing positive for marijuana, the Illinois legislature recently passed (and the Governor signed into law), an amendment (SB 1557) that clarifies what employers can and cannot due under the Adult Use Act

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Published: December 6, 2019

The Lackawanna Court of Common Pleas in Pennsylvania held, in a matter of first impression, that language in the state’s Medical Marijuana Act ("MMA") creates a private right of action for an employee that is terminated for off-site use of medical marijuana.  In Palmiter v.

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