Published: December 21, 2017

On November 27, 2017, Pennsylvania became the next state to join the national trend to limit the use of restrictive covenants when a bill was introduced in the Pennsylvania House that would ban non-competition covenants in employment agreements.

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Published: December 13, 2017

In keeping with the national trend limiting the use of restrictive covenants, in November 2017, the New Jersey Senate introduced SB3518, a bill setting forth sweeping restrictions that would limit the enforceability of non-competes. The bill states that restrictive covenants “impede the development of business in the State by driving skilled workers” out of New Jersey, “discourage innovation and production, impose special hardships on employees . . .

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Published: August 23, 2017

In 1975, the U.S. Supreme Court in the case NLRB v. Weingarten, established the rule that union members have the right to have a union representative present at an interview or meeting that could lead to disciplinary action against the employee. Last Friday, a panel of the U.S.

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Published: December 13, 2016

Last month, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed into law Int. No. 1017-C, dubbed the Freelance Isn’t Free Act (“Act”), a unique law that provides penalties for failure to follow certain standards in contracting with and paying freelance workers.

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Published: September 29, 2016

On September 28, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that would delay by an additional six months the Department of Labor’s new overtime rule which more than doubles the minimum salary level for exemption from overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The new rule, which was unveiled in May 2016 after many months of public comment and debate, is currently set to take effect December 1, 2016.

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Published: February 1, 2013

Last week, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released its annual figures on the state of union membership in the United States. Union membership continued its now-typical trend of declining rolls in 2012. The percent of workers who were union members in 2012 was 11.3%, compared to 11.8% in 2011. The overall number of those belonging to a number likewise decline, from 14.8 million in 2011 to 14.4 million in 2012.

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Published: January 30, 2013

Arnstein & Lehr Chicago Partner Mark Spognardi and Milwaukee Associate Jesse Dill recently published an article, “Michigan right-to-work law continues to put labor on its heels,” in the December 24 issue of Inside Counsel. In the article, they discuss that Michigan became the 24th state to pass “right-to-work” legislation on December 11, amid scenes of protest. The law means that public and private sector employers cannot require employees to become union members or pay union dues as a condition of employment.

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Published: June 28, 2012

On June 21, 2012, the United States Supreme Court, in a 7-2 decision, held that the Service Employees International Union, Local 1000 (SEIU) impinged on the First Amendment rights of California’s public sector employees by requiring non-members to pay 100% of an emergency assessment fund collected without giving them a notice and opportunity to opt out.

Facts

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