Published: November 13, 2017

As a follow up to a recent post on this blog, Illinois Equal Pay Act Likely to be Amended to Prohibit Salary History Inquiries, and in a surprising turn of events, the Illinois Senate did not overturn Governor Bruce Rauner’s veto relating to an amendment updating the Equal Pay Act of 2003 that would, among other things, prohibit employers from inquiring about the salary history of applicants.

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Published: November 2, 2017

Following the lead of many states and cities through the country, Illinois is on the verge of amending its Equal Pay Act to prohibit employers from asking job applicants about their salary history, screening job applicants based on wage history or requiring past salary meet a certain criteria. A copy of the draft amended Equal Pay Act is available for review here. This amendment is aimed at eliminating the practice of “low balling” compensation for female applicants during the recruitment

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Published: October 31, 2017

As sexual harassment becomes the subject of national conversation, some cities, such as Chicago, are making significant changes to laws in an effort to reduce harassment. A recent survey of hotels in the Chicagoland area revealed that more than half of women surveyed were sexually harassed or assaulted while at their job. As a result, on October 11, 2017, the Chicago City Council passed an ordinance aimed at protecting hotel workers.

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Published: March 1, 2016

Chicago has just amended its Human Rights Ordinance to address discrimination targeting current and former members of the military. Effective March 16, 2016, the City of Chicago will prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of military status.

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Published: August 20, 2013

In a somewhat surprising development, the Illinois Appellate Court recently ruled that restrictive covenants are not enforceable if an employee has worked less than two (2) years for the employer seeking enforcement, unless that employee has received special, additional consideration beyond being hired for agreeing to the restriction. Fifield v. Premier Dealer Services (Illinois Appellate Court, 1st District, June 24, 2013).

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Published: August 10, 2012

On August 1, 2012, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed into law a bill that prohibits employers from requesting or requiring employees or prospective employees from providing “any password or other related account information” to gain access to the individual’s social networking account. Ill. Public Act 097-0875. By enacting the legislation, Illinois joins Maryland as states that prohibit employers from obtaining social media account password information. The law amends the Illinois Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act, 820 ILCS 55, and is effective January 1, 2013.

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Published: March 6, 2012

Arnstein & Lehr Chicago Partner Jason Tremblay’s recently published 2012 edition of the handbook, Employment Law Toolkit for Illinois Employers, is now available. The handbook is a comprehensive resource highlighting the significant employment and labor issues facing Illinois employers. It provides practical and cost-effective advice on avoiding employment and labor-related liability and complying with state and federal laws facing employers.

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Published: December 13, 2011

On December 1, 2011, the Illinois Supreme Court issued an opinion in Reliable Fire Equipment Company v. Arnold Arrendondo, et al. that set forth the factors that the Illinois courts should look to in evaluating the reasonableness of non-competition agreements. The Court reaffirmed that a non-competition agreement is reasonable only if the following the following four conditions are met:

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Published: September 30, 2011

In what appears to be another example of cracking down on the improper use of independent contractors, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) recently announced it is entering into agreements with the IRS, as well as some state agencies (including Illinois state agencies), to share information regarding employers who have improperly classified employees. The DOL maintains that these arrangements are necessary to share information and coordinate law enforcement with the participants to end the practice of misclassifying employees.

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