Blog Post
04/14/2022
By Jason Tremblay and Ruth A. Rauls and Sondra Saporta

Earlier this month, Maryland joined nine other states and the District of Columbia in establishing a right to paid family and medical leave for employees in the state. Senate Bill 275, or the Time to Care Act of 2022, entitles Maryland workers to up to 12 weeks of partially paid leave to deal with their own or a family member’s serious illness, welcome a new child, or address needs related to a family member’s military deployment. Workers will be paid out of an insurance pool funded by contributions from both employees and their employers.

Blog Post
04/13/2022
By Carolyn A. Pellegrini

Earlier this month, the top attorney for the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”), General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo (“Abruzzo”), issued Memorandum 22-04 urging the Board to depart from significant and longstanding precedent concerning an employer’s ability to compel employee attendance at meetings addressing unionization.

Blog Post
03/24/2022
By Lisa M. Koblin

On March 10, 2022, Mayor Jim Kenney signed bill 220051-A expanding COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (SPSL) until December 31, 2023. The law requires covered employers to give eligible employees up to 40 hours of additional paid time off for specified COVID-19 purposes, with only limited exceptions. While the new ordinance in many ways mirrors the language of Philadelphia’s 2021 COVID-19 paid leave ordinance, it includes some significant differences in terms of what employers are covered by the new ordinance and how much paid leave an employer is required to provide.

Blog Post
02/23/2022
By Ruth A. Rauls and Erik P. Pramschufer

In a matter of first impression, the New Jersey Appellate Division issued a decision invalidating a recently enacted provision of the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”) which prohibited arbitration of LAD claims. The Appellate Division determined this provision of LAD was preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) because the state and federal laws conflicted. The Appellate Division left other provisions of the amendment intact.

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