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From coast to coast, new states are passing laws that require employers to implement clear pay transparency policies, such as providing specific salary ranges in their job postings. These laws are an expansion of the federal Equal Pay Act – which requires equal pay for equal work among similarly...

On August 19, 2022, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that it would be creating a rule with possible alternatives to the document review process of Section 2 documents for Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification.[1] The proposed rule would allow the Secretary of Homeland...

On May 13, 2022, Governor J.B. Pritzker signed Senate Bill 3146, amending the Illinois “One Day Rest in Seven” Act into law. Shortly after, Governor Pritzker signed into law Senate Bill 3120, the Family Bereavement Leave Act, which amends the Child Bereavement Leave Act. Illinois employers should be...

On April 27, 2022, the Chicago City Council amended the Chicago Human Rights Ordinance (CHRO). The amendments bolster the city’s sexual harassment laws and include enhanced protections for victims of sexual harassment in the workplace. The city’s press release announcing the changes can be accessed...

Pursuant to an amendment to the New York Civil Rights Law that will take effect on May 7, 2022, private-sector employers that monitor their employees’ use of telephones, email, and the internet must notify employees of any electronic monitoring practices.

Earlier this month, Maryland joined nine other states and the District of Columbia in establishing a right to paid family and medical leave for employees in the state. Senate Bill 275, or the Time to Care Act of 2022, entitles Maryland workers to up to 12 weeks of partially paid leave to deal with...

On March 10, 2022, Mayor Jim Kenney signed bill 220051-A expanding COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (SPSL) until December 31, 2023. The law requires covered employers to give eligible employees up to 40 hours of additional paid time off for specified COVID-19 purposes, with only limited...

In a matter of first impression, the New Jersey Appellate Division issued a decision invalidating a recently enacted provision of the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (“LAD”) which prohibited arbitration of LAD claims. The Appellate Division determined this provision of LAD was preempted by the...

On Thursday, February 10, 2022, the United States Senate passed a bill amending the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) to prohibit compulsory arbitration for individual, joint, class or collective action claims based on workplace sexual harassment and/or sexual assault. The House bill, which generated...

The H-1B program allows U.S. employers to temporarily employ foreign workers in occupations that require the theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge and a bachelor’s degree or higher in the specific specialty, or its equivalent. H-1B specialty occupations may...

What’s Next for Employers After SCOTUS’ Decisions on the OSHA ETS Mandate and the CMS Rule? On January 13, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court reinstituted the stay of the federal vaccine or testing mandate, effectively killing the rule that would have obligated all companies with more than 100 employees...

On December 17, 2021, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals dissolved the previously-issued stay on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) vaccine or testing requirement for private employers with at least 100 employees. OSHA originally instituted the requirement through an...

With the calendar flipping to December, businesses should take stock of their employment policies and practices in preparation for the new year. Below we identify a few issues (other than COVID-19-related issues) that employers should have on their radar as 2021 comes to a close. Sexual Harassment...

This is the first in a series on key issues regarding the “Return to Office.” We started planning this series earlier this summer and, like many of our clients’ plans, it got delayed and kept evolving. We recognize that a significant number of employers have been back to work since spring 2020 --...

Following a hopeful reprieve early this summer from mask mandates, the aggressive spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19 has renewed worldwide concern about COVID safety precautions. This concern is felt no greater than by employers as they prepare to or are in the throes of welcoming employees...

Vaccinations are available and states are re-opening, but the number of women in the workforce due to the COVID-19 pandemic is still at historic lows. As companies begin to return their workers to the office, they should also begin thinking about how to reshape diversity and inclusion efforts in...

Labor & Employment attorneys Anna Maria Tejada and Zach Kimmel will continue to lead HR professionals through the lifecycle of an employee during part three of their four part series. The topic of discussion will be employee leave. After the program concludes, we will be sharing tangible takeaways...

New Jersey’s Governor has taken aim at employee misclassification by signing into law four Bills that anoint heightened administrative powers to the New Jersey Department of Labor (“DOL”), require additional reporting requirements, and amend the New Jersey Insurance Fraud Act (“NJIFA”) to allow for...

July 3, 2021 marked National CROWN Day – the second anniversary of when California became the first state to pass a CROWN law in July 2019. CROWN laws, or laws for "Creating a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural Hair," are part of a nationwide effort seeking to "ensure protection against...

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently issued a technical assistance document for “Protections Against Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity.” The document briefly explains the Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, No...

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